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Disabled man in wheelchair, Tampa Disability Attorneys

Disability Benefits and Working

Receiving Benefits While You Work and Reporting Problems

One of the most common questions that Tampa disability attorneys hear is whether a claimant can continue to work while receiving Social Security disability benefits. While a person is able to do both, a Tampa disability attorney can explain the importance of staying below certain income guidelines.

Earnings Cap

The 2015 guidelines permit Social Security disability claimants to receive up to $1,090 a month in gross income and still retain the full amount of Social Security disability benefits. If a claimant earns more than this amount, he or she will no longer be eligible to receive benefits after the claimant’s nine-month trial work-period ends.

Recommended Earnings

Your Tampa disability lawyer may recommend that you make less than the substantial gainful activity amount to avoid potential problems that may prevent you from retaining your benefits. He or she may recommend that you keep your income below the trial work-period services amount, which is $780 beginning in January 2015. As long as a claimant’s income is below this amount, he or she will not use up the trial-work period months and can save these months for a later time.

Delayed Benefits

In some cases, a person’s Social Security benefits may be delayed after being informed of his or her approval for benefits. In particular, if you have not received a Notice of Award within 45 days from the date that you were alerted of your approval. Your Tampa disability attorney may recommend sending a fax to the payment center. If you do not receive a response within 45 days, your attorney may recommend sending another fax with a copy of the original fax. Another way to attempt to speed up your receipt of benefits is to make a congressional inquiry. Each representative and senator has a member of his or her staff who specializes in working with the Social Security Administration. A final recourse is to contact a supervisor at the Social Security office where you applied for benefits so that he or she can arrange for payment.